Mia, 23, Sweden. Trying to live a healthier and happier life, building a better relationship with food & with myself.

If you want to tag me in a post, I track the tag tonedcurves.



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LilySlim Exercise days tickers

LilySlim Exercise days tickers

LilySlim Exercise days tickers

(Source: juliannegoespro, via qetfit)


Friday, October 18th 2013 at 7:30PM          ▲ 3496  notes          ▲ run, boost,








runnermotivation:

Autumn running

runnermotivation:

Autumn running

(Source: runningofsummits, via gmathis67)


Wednesday, October 2nd 2013 at 1:31PM          ▲ 14295  notes          ▲ run,








weightliftingyogi:

Just finished this little webinar through the American Council on Exercise on how to train for 5k, 10k, and marathons. I thought I’d share some tips for all my running fanatic followers :)

(Source: my-trainer-tiffany, via my-trainer-tiffany)


Wednesday, October 2nd 2013 at 1:16PM          ▲ 1037  notes          ▲ tips, run,








somaras-fit-life:

health-freeak:

Running Tips:
Wear spandex shorts under your regular running shorts so you don’t chafe
Cotton socks will only lead to blisters; invest in socks designed for running.
Join your local running club—check with your local running store fitness center and/or recreation department to find one
Find a committed running partner. It is much harder to skip a run when you have someone else depending on you
Remember that- It gets easier.
Accept and appreciate the fact that not every single run can be a good one
Do not compare yourself to others. Run within yourself and for yourself first.
Even a bad run is better then no run at all
If you normally run with music try skipping it and listening to your feet to hear your pace and your gait
Don’t be discouraged if you don’t experience weight loss immediately
Start a running blog, to see your progress and set goals
Hydrate. Make it a habit to drink water throughout the day
On long runs eat something every hour—whether you feel like it or not
During longer runs if you don’t like to carry water take some cash in your pocket pouch or a shoe wallet. Run a route where there’s a corner store that you can use as a pit stop to pick up your water and maybe use the bathroom
To aid recovery the most crucial time to eat and drink is in the hour immediately after you run
Use Vaseline or BodyGlide wherever things rub. They will help prevent blisters and chafing
Do not increase your mileage more than 10 percent per week
If you are prone to shin splints and lower leg pain try running soft trails for your Training runs and save the asphalt for race day
Do not run two hard days back-to-back
Ice aches and pains immediately
Pay attention to your form. Try to run lightly to minimize impact that could lead to injury
When running don’t forget the bug spray, sunscreen and a hat- BIG TIME!
Neosporin (or another antibiotic cream) is good for chafed areas
Make sure you cut your toenails short enough so they don’t jam into your Shoes
Be careful about running on paths that force you to run consistently on a slant. It’s hard on the hips knees
Don’t stretch before a run. Warm up by walking briskly or jogging slowly for several minutes
Do not ice for more than 20 minutes at a time
For beginners, set mini goals to keep you motivated. (Can be minutes [run 5, walk 10], run between street lights then walk between street lights, run till the next bus stop, until you pass a car on the street)
Do not use the hot tub after a race. It will increase inflammation and hinder healing
Be aware of cyclists approaching you from behind and try to keep to the right. Try to pay special attention when running with music
Run facing traffic.
Never assume a car sees you
Doubleknot your shoe laces so they will not come undone when you run\
If you listen to music, put earbuds in the go inside your ear, if you are usuing the ones that sit in your ear, it will fall out
Buy yourself some actual running shoes from an actual running store because running in junk “sneakers” will destroy your feet and your legs
At first keep your runs short and slow to avoid injury and soreness so you do not quit.
If you are breathing too hard slow down or walk a bit until you feel comfortable again
Pick your route close to home (out your front door)—the more convenient it is the better chance you will have sticking with it.
Set realistic short term and long term goals
Remember Soreness one to two days after a run is normal (delayed onset muscle soreness).
There’s no shame in walking
Four laps around the local the high school track equals one mile
Vary your training routes. This will prevent boredom and prevent your body from getting acclimated
Push through rough spots by focusing on the sounds of your breath and feet touching the ground
Do abdominal breathing to get rid of side cramps
Run on trails if at all possible. It will be easier on your body and you’ll love it
Dress as if it is 10 degrees warmer than the temperature on the thermometer
Run early in the morning or later in evening to avoid mid-day heat
To keep cool in hot weather soak a bandana in cold water wring it out a bit and tie it loosely around your neck
In the winter dress in layers (coolmax or other technical clothing) and wear a headband over your running hat to cover your ears
These are SO helpful! I’ve finally started running and these tips will help me and get me more motivated! (:follow: http://health-freeak.tumblr.com/

I like that there is no shame in walking and you shouldn’t assume that a car sees you

somaras-fit-life:

health-freeak:

Running Tips:

  1. Wear spandex shorts under your regular running shorts so you don’t chafe
  2. Cotton socks will only lead to blisters; invest in socks designed for running.
  3. Join your local running club—check with your local running store fitness center and/or recreation department to find one
  4. Find a committed running partner. It is much harder to skip a run when you have someone else depending on you
  5. Remember that- It gets easier.
  6. Accept and appreciate the fact that not every single run can be a good one
  7. Do not compare yourself to others. Run within yourself and for yourself first.
  8. Even a bad run is better then no run at all
  9. If you normally run with music try skipping it and listening to your feet to hear your pace and your gait
  10. Don’t be discouraged if you don’t experience weight loss immediately
  11. Start a running blog, to see your progress and set goals
  12. Hydrate. Make it a habit to drink water throughout the day
  13. On long runs eat something every hour—whether you feel like it or not
  14. During longer runs if you don’t like to carry water take some cash in your pocket pouch or a shoe wallet. Run a route where there’s a corner store that you can use as a pit stop to pick up your water and maybe use the bathroom
  15. To aid recovery the most crucial time to eat and drink is in the hour immediately after you run
  16. Use Vaseline or BodyGlide wherever things rub. They will help prevent blisters and chafing
  17. Do not increase your mileage more than 10 percent per week
  18. If you are prone to shin splints and lower leg pain try running soft trails for your Training runs and save the asphalt for race day
  19. Do not run two hard days back-to-back
  20. Ice aches and pains immediately
  21. Pay attention to your form. Try to run lightly to minimize impact that could lead to injury
  22. When running don’t forget the bug spray, sunscreen and a hat- BIG TIME!
  23. Neosporin (or another antibiotic cream) is good for chafed areas
  24. Make sure you cut your toenails short enough so they don’t jam into your Shoes
  25. Be careful about running on paths that force you to run consistently on a slant. It’s hard on the hips knees
  26. Don’t stretch before a run. Warm up by walking briskly or jogging slowly for several minutes
  27. Do not ice for more than 20 minutes at a time
  28. For beginners, set mini goals to keep you motivated. (Can be minutes [run 5, walk 10], run between street lights then walk between street lights, run till the next bus stop, until you pass a car on the street)
  29. Do not use the hot tub after a race. It will increase inflammation and hinder healing
  30. Be aware of cyclists approaching you from behind and try to keep to the right. Try to pay special attention when running with music
  31. Run facing traffic.
  32. Never assume a car sees you
  33. Doubleknot your shoe laces so they will not come undone when you run\
  34. If you listen to music, put earbuds in the go inside your ear, if you are usuing the ones that sit in your ear, it will fall out
  35. Buy yourself some actual running shoes from an actual running store because running in junk “sneakers” will destroy your feet and your legs
  36. At first keep your runs short and slow to avoid injury and soreness so you do not quit.
  37. If you are breathing too hard slow down or walk a bit until you feel comfortable again
  38. Pick your route close to home (out your front door)—the more convenient it is the better chance you will have sticking with it.
  39. Set realistic short term and long term goals
  40. Remember Soreness one to two days after a run is normal (delayed onset muscle soreness).
  41. There’s no shame in walking
  42. Four laps around the local the high school track equals one mile
  43. Vary your training routes. This will prevent boredom and prevent your body from getting acclimated
  44. Push through rough spots by focusing on the sounds of your breath and feet touching the ground
  45. Do abdominal breathing to get rid of side cramps
  46. Run on trails if at all possible. It will be easier on your body and you’ll love it
  47. Dress as if it is 10 degrees warmer than the temperature on the thermometer
  48. Run early in the morning or later in evening to avoid mid-day heat
  49. To keep cool in hot weather soak a bandana in cold water wring it out a bit and tie it loosely around your neck
  50. In the winter dress in layers (coolmax or other technical clothing) and wear a headband over your running hat to cover your ears

These are SO helpful! I’ve finally started running and these tips will help me and get me more motivated! (:
follow: http://health-freeak.tumblr.com/

I like that there is no shame in walking and you shouldn’t assume that a car sees you

(via 80-d-a-y-s)


Wednesday, October 2nd 2013 at 1:15PM          ▲ 36547  notes          ▲ run, tips,









Wednesday, October 2nd 2013 at 1:14PM          ▲ 292  notes          ▲ run, boost,








(Source: cwiczyc, via qetfit)


Wednesday, October 2nd 2013 at 1:02PM          ▲ 3786  notes          ▲ run,








(Source: brightfitness, via liftingyogi)


Wednesday, October 2nd 2013 at 1:02PM          ▲ 7501  notes          ▲ run,








a-fitness-fantasy:

the-exercist:


The 10 Mistakes You Make When Running
You don’t switch your route: Same time, same route can make for a boring workout — and stats that don’t ever improve. Switching up your route will challenge different muscles, keep you motivated, and improve your running skills. Don’t stick to your tried-and-true trail; find a new running route with these tips.
You don’t fuel right: You may be able to power through a short run without any food, but if you’re going long, you need fuel and water. Time your run so it’s two to three hours after a meal, or have a snack full of carbs and protein (like one of these pre-workout snacks) about 30 minutes to an hour before you go for a run. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water well before you step out; drinking too much right before you go can cause cramps.
You don’t warm up: Starting your run at full force is not a good idea. You’ll feel sluggish, tight, and discouraged if you don’t warm up before that sprint. Do a light jog or five minutes of brisk walking before starting your actual run.
You don’t cool down: You came, you conquered, you’re done with your run. Don’t stop now, however; you still need to take a few minutes to stretch your warmed muscles to help you recover. These postrun stretches will help increase your flexibility and reduce muscle soreness.
You don’t check your form: Running may seem natural, but a few body adjustments can make a big difference, allowing you to run faster, longer, and more efficiently. Make a mental note to pay attention to your running form every once in a while; your shoulders should be relaxed and down, your arms should swing parallel to the ground (without crossing your midsection), and your head should be up and looking forward, not down. Get more tips on proper running form here.
You don’t challenge yourself: If you want to be a better runner, you need to up your pace. Intervals and tempo runs help you increase your speed in the short term, so that in the long run, you become a faster, better runner.
You run in the wrong gear: Sweat-soaked cotton shirts, shoes without enough support, and pants with chafing seams — all of these can cut a run short or at least make you not want to go out again. Invest in a few key pieces once you’ve upped your mileage; you’ll be surprised by how much what you wear matters. Don’t worry, we’ve got you — check out our list of what not to wear when running here.
You push yourself too hard: Challenging yourself is great, but doing too much too soon is a common cause of runner burnout, not to mention injuries. Start off slow and gradually increase your pace as you get more comfortable. Remember not to ramp up your mileage too quickly; increase your total by only 10 percent every week.
Your strides are too long: It may feel good to bound down that trail, but if you make a habit of taking too-long strides, you may tire more quickly. Shorter strides are also easier on your knees, so if you find yourself going long, shorten your steps and see if it feels better.
You’re not consistent: It’s not going to get easier unless you stick with it. Try to run three times a week if you want to become a better runner; you’ll be amazed at how much easier that three-miler seems after just a few weeks of running.




Follow for health, fitness, & motivation! :)

a-fitness-fantasy:

the-exercist:

The 10 Mistakes You Make When Running

  1. You don’t switch your route: Same time, same route can make for a boring workout — and stats that don’t ever improve. Switching up your route will challenge different muscles, keep you motivated, and improve your running skills. Don’t stick to your tried-and-true trail; find a new running route with these tips.
  2. You don’t fuel right: You may be able to power through a short run without any food, but if you’re going long, you need fuel and water. Time your run so it’s two to three hours after a meal, or have a snack full of carbs and protein (like one of these pre-workout snacks) about 30 minutes to an hour before you go for a run. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water well before you step out; drinking too much right before you go can cause cramps.
  3. You don’t warm up: Starting your run at full force is not a good idea. You’ll feel sluggish, tight, and discouraged if you don’t warm up before that sprint. Do a light jog or five minutes of brisk walking before starting your actual run.
  4. You don’t cool down: You came, you conquered, you’re done with your run. Don’t stop now, however; you still need to take a few minutes to stretch your warmed muscles to help you recover. These postrun stretches will help increase your flexibility and reduce muscle soreness.
  5. You don’t check your form: Running may seem natural, but a few body adjustments can make a big difference, allowing you to run faster, longer, and more efficiently. Make a mental note to pay attention to your running form every once in a while; your shoulders should be relaxed and down, your arms should swing parallel to the ground (without crossing your midsection), and your head should be up and looking forward, not down. Get more tips on proper running form here.
  6. You don’t challenge yourself: If you want to be a better runner, you need to up your pace. Intervals and tempo runs help you increase your speed in the short term, so that in the long run, you become a faster, better runner.
  7. You run in the wrong gear: Sweat-soaked cotton shirts, shoes without enough support, and pants with chafing seams — all of these can cut a run short or at least make you not want to go out again. Invest in a few key pieces once you’ve upped your mileage; you’ll be surprised by how much what you wear matters. Don’t worry, we’ve got you — check out our list of what not to wear when running here.
  8. You push yourself too hard: Challenging yourself is great, but doing too much too soon is a common cause of runner burnout, not to mention injuries. Start off slow and gradually increase your pace as you get more comfortable. Remember not to ramp up your mileage too quickly; increase your total by only 10 percent every week.
  9. Your strides are too long: It may feel good to bound down that trail, but if you make a habit of taking too-long strides, you may tire more quickly. Shorter strides are also easier on your knees, so if you find yourself going long, shorten your steps and see if it feels better.
  10. You’re not consistent: It’s not going to get easier unless you stick with it. Try to run three times a week if you want to become a better runner; you’ll be amazed at how much easier that three-miler seems after just a few weeks of running.

Follow for health, fitness, & motivation! :)

(via mandyqueenofsquats-deactivated2)


Friday, September 27th 2013 at 1:22PM          ▲ 7838  notes          ▲ tips, run,








10000steps:

-

Friday, September 27th 2013 at 1:13PM          ▲ 3029  notes          ▲ run, boost,









Friday, September 27th 2013 at 11:50AM          ▲ 2379  notes          ▲ yoga, run, exercise,








"Run the first mile with your legs, the second mile with your mind, and the third mile with your heart. "


Tuesday, June 4th 2013 at 4:08PM          ▲ 4349  notes          ▲ run,









Tuesday, June 4th 2013 at 4:02PM          ▲ 4572  notes          ▲ run,








the-exercist:

How to Breath While Running
Learn to breathe deeply: Your lungs are just a bit smaller than your ribcage, but we all tend to use just the top third of the lung. One reason being that, like all muscles, the intercostals, which run between the ribs, can get tight and inflexible, limiting the expansiveness of your lungs. When you take a deep breath, you are expanding the lungs, pressing down the diaphragm, and causing your abdomen to expand as your lungs fill with air. Learning to breathe this way helps you take in lots of oxygen while running, preventing dizziness and nausea. With a little training and some stretching you can breathe to your full potential to increase your endurance. Cross-training with noncardio workouts like yoga and Pilates can also help you learn to breathe from your diaphragm. Here are some tips for how to conquer diaphragmatic breathing.
Here’s what else you can do to control your breathing during runs.
Match your breathing to your steps: For an easy-paced run, inhale for three or four steps then exhale for the same amount. Count the steps in your head while you adjust to breathing on tempo. If you are running more intensely, your breathing tempo will increase to support your increased energy output and become faster — a breath in for one to two steps and out for one to two steps. If you can’t match your steps to your breathing tempo then you are trying to run too fast; slow down, and get back into your rhythm. Rhythm is key!
Breathing in the cooler temps: It’s important to breathe through your nose while running in chillier weather because cold air is dry and breathing through your mouth increases the dryness while decreasing the temperature of the air. Since your lungs do not like dry air, you can experience asthma-like symptoms, like wheezing and coughing, when breathing cold air in through your mouth. Breathing through your nose not only filters out air impurities, but also warms cool air to body temperature, creating less shock for the lungs to decrease those asthma-like symptoms.
How to breathe through your nose: If nose breathing is difficult for you, start experimenting with the technique now before the temperature drops drastically. Breathing through the nose helps you breathe more deeply and efficiently, which will ultimately help your running no matter what the temperature is. If you plan to run in cold temps and have yet to master nose breathing, you can try wearing a bandanna (or a shirt that can be pulled up far) over your nose and mouth to help trap the moisture of your breath and humidify the air before it reaches your lungs.

the-exercist:

How to Breath While Running

  1. Learn to breathe deeply: Your lungs are just a bit smaller than your ribcage, but we all tend to use just the top third of the lung. One reason being that, like all muscles, the intercostals, which run between the ribs, can get tight and inflexible, limiting the expansiveness of your lungs. When you take a deep breath, you are expanding the lungs, pressing down the diaphragm, and causing your abdomen to expand as your lungs fill with air. Learning to breathe this way helps you take in lots of oxygen while running, preventing dizziness and nausea. With a little training and some stretching you can breathe to your full potential to increase your endurance. Cross-training with noncardio workouts like yoga and Pilates can also help you learn to breathe from your diaphragm. Here are some tips for how to conquer diaphragmatic breathing.

Here’s what else you can do to control your breathing during runs.

  1. Match your breathing to your steps: For an easy-paced run, inhale for three or four steps then exhale for the same amount. Count the steps in your head while you adjust to breathing on tempo. If you are running more intensely, your breathing tempo will increase to support your increased energy output and become faster — a breath in for one to two steps and out for one to two steps. If you can’t match your steps to your breathing tempo then you are trying to run too fast; slow down, and get back into your rhythm. Rhythm is key!
  2. Breathing in the cooler temps: It’s important to breathe through your nose while running in chillier weather because cold air is dry and breathing through your mouth increases the dryness while decreasing the temperature of the air. Since your lungs do not like dry air, you can experience asthma-like symptoms, like wheezing and coughing, when breathing cold air in through your mouth. Breathing through your nose not only filters out air impurities, but also warms cool air to body temperature, creating less shock for the lungs to decrease those asthma-like symptoms.
  3. How to breathe through your nose: If nose breathing is difficult for you, start experimenting with the technique now before the temperature drops drastically. Breathing through the nose helps you breathe more deeply and efficiently, which will ultimately help your running no matter what the temperature is. If you plan to run in cold temps and have yet to master nose breathing, you can try wearing a bandanna (or a shirt that can be pulled up far) over your nose and mouth to help trap the moisture of your breath and humidify the air before it reaches your lungs.

Monday, June 3rd 2013 at 3:51PM          ▲ 44  notes          ▲ run, tips,









Saturday, June 1st 2013 at 8:31PM          ▲ 158  notes          ▲ boost, run,








in-fitnessandin-health:

faithhopefit:

thatfitgirl96:

onefitmodel:

STRETCH

perfect

i needed this because half of my injuries are due to my lack of stretching out after a run. 

EXCELLENT!

in-fitnessandin-health:

faithhopefit:

thatfitgirl96:

onefitmodel:

STRETCH

perfect

i needed this because half of my injuries are due to my lack of stretching out after a run. 

EXCELLENT!

(Source: funfitandfab, via fuckfat-beslim)


Thursday, May 30th 2013 at 2:50PM          ▲ 9499  notes          ▲ run, stretching, yoga, tips,








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